Journey to Success After YELP

Arnold Atwiine- architect, founder of Sage Intergrated Real Estate Concepts, aspiring chef and a fellow of the 2017 cohort of our Young and Emerging Leaders Project. We caught up with him on what has been transpiring in his life and career since he graduated from the fellowship, the lessons he's learnt and his advice to the future YELP fellows.

Arnold Atwiine- architect, founder of Sage Intergrated Real Estate Concepts, aspiring chef and a fellow of the 2017 cohort of our Young and Emerging Leaders Project. We caught up with him on what has been transpiring in his life and career since he graduated from the fellowship, the lessons he’s learnt and his advice to the future YELP fellows.

What have you been working on since you graduated as a YELP fellow?

Quite a lot, I guess. I have been putting my networks to work ever since I graduated as a YELP fellow- Danstun Mugarura, who was a facilitator at the last seminar, became one of my private clients, as well as, Barbara Kasekende, of Stanbic bank Uganda, who became an impactful resource for the growth of my design and build company, Sage Intergrated Real Estate Concepts.

Have you found the lessons you encountered during the fellowship to be useful in your career and your own leadership journey?

Yes, I often have. Firstly, I have learnt that there is so much patience, dedication and hard work required in private business. Getting an efficient team through previous working experience, whilst continuously inspiring them- is one of the hardest things I have encountered. Promising that there shall be a successful future and always holding the vision, are some of the things that have enabled me to maintain high spirits in my team . In a nut shell, the lessons I encountered in YELP, such as sticking to my thread whilst keeping a focused open mind and trusting the process, are the tools that help me navigate the turbulent entrepreneurial journey. Additionally, as a result of the network with Stanbic Bank that YELP offered us, myself alongside three of my other fellows- Benjamin, Cleofash and Manzi, were privileged to speak at the National Schools Championship, on the possibilities available outside conventional employment.

How have the networks you gained through your class and the LéO network as a whole, been influential in growing your projects and impacting the community beyond yourself?

Having had the opportunity to meet and engage with exposed people with different backgrounds and cultures, I have improved my work ethic, and now work with an open mind in my pursuit to become a renowned architect and chef (cooking as one of my hobbies). Regarding people around me, my team and I are looking forward to designing and building modern and affordable residential housing for mid-income earners in Kampala City and beyond. Those who need decent homes with fair budgets.

What advice would you give young people that could be looking to be involved in something like YELP?

What I can tell them is that joining YELP will change their perspective in life, it will enlighten them about the struggles we all face, and how to overcome them in our different endeavors. It has a family feel, with brilliant people from different walks of life. Definitely a worthy experience!

YELP 2017 fellows at their graduation ceremony.
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Charlene Kamali
Author: Charlene Kamali
Communications and Partnerships Coordinator, LeO Africa Institute.

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